HomeFWJ TakeawayResourcesTaking control of goods

If you have a judgment debt - then getting the High Court Enforcement Officer to seize goods can be a great way to enforce. Our experts can guide you through the process.

Taking control of goods may often be the quickest method of enforcement of a county court judgment or CCJ. The procedure is simple and straightforward. A writ or warrant of control is issued by the court office and notice is subsequently given to the judgment debtor by the enforcement officer. In our experience, the threat of enforcement may even be enough, in some cases, to result in payment of a judgment debt.

We have found that both writs and warrants of control are equally successful against individuals or corporate debtors. For example,

  • an individual may have a car or other personal items of value which can be seized if payment is not made;
  • the corporate debtor may have stock, machinery, office equipment or vehicles which can also be taken and sold.

Taking control of goods can be undertaken alongside other methods of enforcement, although a judgment Creditor needs permission of the court to choose this option at the same time as an attachment of earnings order is in force.

Before issuing a writ or warrant of control, it is vital to consider:

  • whether the judgment debt is due and has not been paid.
  • what assets the debtor has, i.e. either goods which can be sold at auction or enough money to meet the judgment debt so as to stop goods being taken and sold. If the judgment is sizeable, unless the debtor has particularly high value goods, charging orders or third party debt orders may be a better method of enforcement.

Please contact one of our experts today for your friendly consultation. At Francis Wilks and Jones, we have a team dedicated to enforcing judgments through taking control of goods ready to take your call. Whatever your question, we can help you. Don’t delay – contact the taking control of goods experts now.

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